Queen B: Why Beyoncé's Vogue September Cover Matters

"There's only one September Issue and there's only one Beyoncé."

Beyoncé has made history yet again by being the first Black female singer to cover Vogue's September Issue, standing on the shoulders of fellow Black women Naomi Campbell in 1989 and Halle Berry in 2010 - pretty elite company there. 

This cover is important not only because Beyoncé is the biggest female singer of our time - I mean, her work spans generations, she "runs the world", actually BROKE THE INTERNET (still not over her surprise album release in 2013), changed the way the music business operates overnight (if you're not Beyoncé don't try and drop an album with no promo... like come on now...), and little girls (maybe even little boys), HELL, I look like up her. It's important because the Vogue September issue is arguably the most important magazine issue of the entire year in the fashion world. It sets standards and trends. It introduces rising stars to the world. It moves us from spring/summer to fall/winter and helps us feel like we can change right along with the seasons. 

This cover is important because Beyoncé makes little Black girls feel like they can sing, dance, act, model, be a #carefreeblackgirl, or be a Queen just like she is if they want to be. Queendom aside, her cover matters because women of color are so often underrepresented on covers and in magazine spreads. In the age of cultural appropriation, most women of color see their culture reflected in magazines because America loves the facial features, hair, and swag of women of color, without loving the place from which these traits came. America loves Black culture. America doesn't always love Black people, especially Black women. 

Given the history of the fashion industry when it comes to women of color (colorism, appropriation, skin lightening controversies, etc.), we hope this cover is a step in the right direction. A direction that truly celebrates diversity, appreciates the features and swag of women of color ON women of color, and opens the door for more flawless women of color to slay September issues, runways, and magazine spreads alike. This cover certainly is a win for Queen B and all who will see it. Hopefully, this means the fashion industry is moving towards making diversity the norm and not just an exception. Can't wait to get a copy! 

All hail Queen B! 

Images: Vogue 

Gabrielle HickmonComment